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The social rented sector, housing and the welfare state in the UK

The social rented sector, housing and the welfare state in the UK Abstract Recent discussions of the social rented sector in the UK have placed considerable emphasis on the restructuring and declining size of the tenure, privatisation, a shift from object to subject subsidies, residualisation and the increased significance of the poverty trap for tenants. Against this background, and in the light of the view that major public sector investment is unlikely in the future, the policy debate has shifted further towards concern with transfer of stock out of the public sector. This paper reviews key changes in the role of social rented sector housing and the background to these debates. It argues that it is important to relate the development of council housing to the wider structure of the welfare state; its position within the public sector; the changing structure of the private sector in housing; and the changing economic, social and demographic context. These aspects are of key importance to debates about residualisation and the future of the sector. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Housing Studies Taylor & Francis

The social rented sector, housing and the welfare state in the UK

Housing Studies , Volume 12 (4): 25 – Oct 1, 1997
25 pages

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References (45)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1466-1810
eISSN
0267-3037
DOI
10.1080/02673039708720909
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Recent discussions of the social rented sector in the UK have placed considerable emphasis on the restructuring and declining size of the tenure, privatisation, a shift from object to subject subsidies, residualisation and the increased significance of the poverty trap for tenants. Against this background, and in the light of the view that major public sector investment is unlikely in the future, the policy debate has shifted further towards concern with transfer of stock out of the public sector. This paper reviews key changes in the role of social rented sector housing and the background to these debates. It argues that it is important to relate the development of council housing to the wider structure of the welfare state; its position within the public sector; the changing structure of the private sector in housing; and the changing economic, social and demographic context. These aspects are of key importance to debates about residualisation and the future of the sector.

Journal

Housing StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 1997

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