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The Turkish model

The Turkish model ANDREW MANGO In June 1992 the former Soviet republics of Central Asia received a visit from Mme Catherine Lalumiere, the Secretary General of the Council of Europe, a body dedicated to the defence and propagation of European concepts of human rights. Having seen how things stood there and looking hopefully into the future, Mme Lalumiere declared that Turkey provided a valid model of development for many a newly-independent country in Asia. A Turkish political economist, Professor Ay din Yalcjn, quoting Mme Lalumiere's statements, noted that the concept of the Turkish model had arisen outside Turkey. Inside Turkey, said Professor Yalcin, this had caused surprise mixed with pleasure, given that 'the reform movement which for nearly two hundred years had struggled to bring westernisation and modernisation cannot yet be considered to have produced a defini- tive result' and that there were even doubts whether 'in the face of the emergence of contrary trends in places, we have in fact created a specific, systematic and conscious model.' Talk of a Turkish model, Professor Yalgin added, acted as a stimulant in the difficulties and disappointments which attended his country's efforts to create a democratic and pluralistic society, at a time when it http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Middle Eastern Studies Taylor & Francis

The Turkish model

Middle Eastern Studies , Volume 29 (4): 32 – Oct 1, 1993

The Turkish model

Middle Eastern Studies , Volume 29 (4): 32 – Oct 1, 1993

Abstract

ANDREW MANGO In June 1992 the former Soviet republics of Central Asia received a visit from Mme Catherine Lalumiere, the Secretary General of the Council of Europe, a body dedicated to the defence and propagation of European concepts of human rights. Having seen how things stood there and looking hopefully into the future, Mme Lalumiere declared that Turkey provided a valid model of development for many a newly-independent country in Asia. A Turkish political economist, Professor Ay din Yalcjn, quoting Mme Lalumiere's statements, noted that the concept of the Turkish model had arisen outside Turkey. Inside Turkey, said Professor Yalcin, this had caused surprise mixed with pleasure, given that 'the reform movement which for nearly two hundred years had struggled to bring westernisation and modernisation cannot yet be considered to have produced a defini- tive result' and that there were even doubts whether 'in the face of the emergence of contrary trends in places, we have in fact created a specific, systematic and conscious model.' Talk of a Turkish model, Professor Yalgin added, acted as a stimulant in the difficulties and disappointments which attended his country's efforts to create a democratic and pluralistic society, at a time when it

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References (13)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1743-7881
eISSN
0026-3206
DOI
10.1080/00263209308700977
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ANDREW MANGO In June 1992 the former Soviet republics of Central Asia received a visit from Mme Catherine Lalumiere, the Secretary General of the Council of Europe, a body dedicated to the defence and propagation of European concepts of human rights. Having seen how things stood there and looking hopefully into the future, Mme Lalumiere declared that Turkey provided a valid model of development for many a newly-independent country in Asia. A Turkish political economist, Professor Ay din Yalcjn, quoting Mme Lalumiere's statements, noted that the concept of the Turkish model had arisen outside Turkey. Inside Turkey, said Professor Yalcin, this had caused surprise mixed with pleasure, given that 'the reform movement which for nearly two hundred years had struggled to bring westernisation and modernisation cannot yet be considered to have produced a defini- tive result' and that there were even doubts whether 'in the face of the emergence of contrary trends in places, we have in fact created a specific, systematic and conscious model.' Talk of a Turkish model, Professor Yalgin added, acted as a stimulant in the difficulties and disappointments which attended his country's efforts to create a democratic and pluralistic society, at a time when it

Journal

Middle Eastern StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 1993

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