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The wise teacher: A developmental model of teaching

The wise teacher: A developmental model of teaching Patricia Kennedy Arlin The Wise Teacher: A Developmental Model of Teaching F COURSE THOSE CHILDREN WERE THINKING, bu t psychological perspective, certain dimensions are I wasn't asking them what they were think- typical of wise people. These dimensions can be ing about. In my great desire to share all the knowl- translated into a description not only of a wise edge and expertise I possessed, I was much too person but also of a wise teacher. Clayton (1976) rushed to allow them to share their thinking with me and with each other. In fact, I rarely asked them to asked ordinary people to define the word wisdom. think—I did all the thinking for them. It was only Clayton identified three dimensions of wisdom from when I was willing to give up my role as the "ex- these definitions. Her dimensions include: (a) af- pert" who had all the answers that I was able to gain fective characteristics that include compassion and "expertise" in the classroom. (Clark, Clark, Fidler, empathy, (b) reflective processes such as introspec- & Underwood, 1993, pp. 374-375) tion and intuition, and (c) cognitive capacities, for These words of Marcia Fidler, a seventh and example, experience and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Theory Into Practice Taylor & Francis

The wise teacher: A developmental model of teaching

Theory Into Practice , Volume 38 (1): 6 – Jan 1, 1999
6 pages

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References (16)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1543-0421
eISSN
0040-5841
DOI
10.1080/00405849909543825
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Patricia Kennedy Arlin The Wise Teacher: A Developmental Model of Teaching F COURSE THOSE CHILDREN WERE THINKING, bu t psychological perspective, certain dimensions are I wasn't asking them what they were think- typical of wise people. These dimensions can be ing about. In my great desire to share all the knowl- translated into a description not only of a wise edge and expertise I possessed, I was much too person but also of a wise teacher. Clayton (1976) rushed to allow them to share their thinking with me and with each other. In fact, I rarely asked them to asked ordinary people to define the word wisdom. think—I did all the thinking for them. It was only Clayton identified three dimensions of wisdom from when I was willing to give up my role as the "ex- these definitions. Her dimensions include: (a) af- pert" who had all the answers that I was able to gain fective characteristics that include compassion and "expertise" in the classroom. (Clark, Clark, Fidler, empathy, (b) reflective processes such as introspec- & Underwood, 1993, pp. 374-375) tion and intuition, and (c) cognitive capacities, for These words of Marcia Fidler, a seventh and example, experience and

Journal

Theory Into PracticeTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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