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This time is different: eight centuries of financial folly

This time is different: eight centuries of financial folly Accounting, Business & Financial History Vol. 20, No. 3, November 2010, 413–420 BOOK REVIEWS Accountancy and empire. The British legacy of professional organization, edited by Chris Poullaos and Suki Sian, Abingdon, Routledge, 2010, xvii + 263 pp., £80 (hardback), ISBN 978-0-415-45771-2 As an academic with strong interests in both international accounting and accounting history; a former expatriate English chartered accountant who has worked in Nigeria (before independence), Australia and Scotland; and a keen reader of the previous writings of editors Chris Poullaos and Suki Sian, I have been looking forward to the publication of this book. It has been worth the wait. The editors have recruited an expert and well-informed team of contributors. The book is topped and tailed by chapters written jointly by the editors. In between there are chapters by Poullaos on the self-governing dominions of Australia, Canada and South Africa in the 1920s; Alan Richardson on Canada ‘between empires’; Chibuike Uche on Nigeria; Devi Susela on Malaysia; Prem Yapa on Sri Lanka; Owolabi Bakre on Jamaica; Marcia Annisette on Trinidad and Tobago; Shraddha Verma on India; and Sian on Kenya. There is also a Preface by Barbara Bush, a historian of post- colonialism. It would have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Accounting History Review Taylor & Francis

This time is different: eight centuries of financial folly

Accounting History Review , Volume 20 (3): 4 – Nov 1, 2010
8 pages

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References (4)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Mark Billings
ISSN
1466-4275
eISSN
0958-5206
DOI
10.1080/09585206.2010.512722
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Accounting, Business & Financial History Vol. 20, No. 3, November 2010, 413–420 BOOK REVIEWS Accountancy and empire. The British legacy of professional organization, edited by Chris Poullaos and Suki Sian, Abingdon, Routledge, 2010, xvii + 263 pp., £80 (hardback), ISBN 978-0-415-45771-2 As an academic with strong interests in both international accounting and accounting history; a former expatriate English chartered accountant who has worked in Nigeria (before independence), Australia and Scotland; and a keen reader of the previous writings of editors Chris Poullaos and Suki Sian, I have been looking forward to the publication of this book. It has been worth the wait. The editors have recruited an expert and well-informed team of contributors. The book is topped and tailed by chapters written jointly by the editors. In between there are chapters by Poullaos on the self-governing dominions of Australia, Canada and South Africa in the 1920s; Alan Richardson on Canada ‘between empires’; Chibuike Uche on Nigeria; Devi Susela on Malaysia; Prem Yapa on Sri Lanka; Owolabi Bakre on Jamaica; Marcia Annisette on Trinidad and Tobago; Shraddha Verma on India; and Sian on Kenya. There is also a Preface by Barbara Bush, a historian of post- colonialism. It would have

Journal

Accounting History ReviewTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 2010

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