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Threshold effects and the expected benefits of attracting middle‐income households to the central city

Threshold effects and the expected benefits of attracting middle‐income households to the central... Abstract This article looks at the two primary expected benefits of efforts to bring back, or retain, middle‐income households in the central city: (1) improved fiscal conditions caused by increasing the tax base and (2) decreased socioeconomic isolation of central‐city low‐income households. We examine the causal linkages reputed to produce these two benefits in light of the relatively limited relevant theoretical and empirical research. Although stressing that this work is only tentative and intended to be provocative, we cautiously conclude that thresholds matter. That is, it is likely that the number of middle‐income households in a given area must exceed a certain threshold for significant benefits to accrue. The geographic scale of this area, the threshold that applies, and the time needed for benefits to appear depend on the particular causal linkage at issue. In the last section, we derive implications for research and policy evaluation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Housing Policy Debate Taylor & Francis

Threshold effects and the expected benefits of attracting middle‐income households to the central city

Housing Policy Debate , Volume 8 (2): 27 – Jan 1, 1997
27 pages

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References (32)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2152-050X
eISSN
1051-1482
DOI
10.1080/10511482.1997.9521259
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This article looks at the two primary expected benefits of efforts to bring back, or retain, middle‐income households in the central city: (1) improved fiscal conditions caused by increasing the tax base and (2) decreased socioeconomic isolation of central‐city low‐income households. We examine the causal linkages reputed to produce these two benefits in light of the relatively limited relevant theoretical and empirical research. Although stressing that this work is only tentative and intended to be provocative, we cautiously conclude that thresholds matter. That is, it is likely that the number of middle‐income households in a given area must exceed a certain threshold for significant benefits to accrue. The geographic scale of this area, the threshold that applies, and the time needed for benefits to appear depend on the particular causal linkage at issue. In the last section, we derive implications for research and policy evaluation.

Journal

Housing Policy DebateTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1997

Keywords: Cities; Community development; Policy

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