Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Time as a Source of Inequality Within Marriage: Are Husbands More Satisfied With Time for Themselves than Wives?

Time as a Source of Inequality Within Marriage: Are Husbands More Satisfied With Time for... Motivated by popular discussions of the "double work day" for women in dualearner households, this paper examines gender differences among such couples in satisfaction with time for self, drawing on microdata from the 1990 Statistics Canada General Social Survey. While most earlier studies of the distribution of well-being within households focus on material goods, differences in access to free time are a potential source of inequity within the family. This paper gives some evidence that women in dual-earner households are more time-stressed than men, apparently as a result of the continued gendered division of housework, despite high levels of paid work by wives. However, total labor supply is not the main predictor of time stress for wives. Hours per week matter more than weeks per year, presumably because much household work cannot be postponed until another week. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Feminist Economics Taylor & Francis

Time as a Source of Inequality Within Marriage: Are Husbands More Satisfied With Time for Themselves than Wives?

Feminist Economics , Volume 7 (2): 21 – Jan 1, 2001
21 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/time-as-a-source-of-inequality-within-marriage-are-husbands-more-Dmy2BkRF4h

References (38)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1466-4372
eISSN
1354-5701
DOI
10.1080/1354700110068261
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Motivated by popular discussions of the "double work day" for women in dualearner households, this paper examines gender differences among such couples in satisfaction with time for self, drawing on microdata from the 1990 Statistics Canada General Social Survey. While most earlier studies of the distribution of well-being within households focus on material goods, differences in access to free time are a potential source of inequity within the family. This paper gives some evidence that women in dual-earner households are more time-stressed than men, apparently as a result of the continued gendered division of housework, despite high levels of paid work by wives. However, total labor supply is not the main predictor of time stress for wives. Hours per week matter more than weeks per year, presumably because much household work cannot be postponed until another week.

Journal

Feminist EconomicsTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2001

Keywords: Within-HOUSEHOLD Inequality; Intra-HOUSEHOLD Inequality; Subjective Wellmany Being; Unpaid Work; Time; Dual-EARNER Couples

There are no references for this article.