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True friends are hard to find: A machine‐assisted investigation of false, true and just plain unreliable ‘friends’

True friends are hard to find: A machine‐assisted investigation of false, true and just plain... Abstract The phenomenon of false friends is wellknown to translators. What have been studied much less, although they are probably more common, are pairs of words of similar form in related languages which are usually thought of and listed in bilingual dictionaries as reliable translation equivalents, but which, on closer scrutiny, often turn out to be used in different ways in the two languages. Taking examples from English and Italian (e.g. ‘correct’ and ‘corretto'), the author suggests ways of using computer concordancing to investigate context and thus help the translator to know when these ‘look‐alike’ items can be treated as equivalents and when, instead, another item from the same semantic field would be a better choice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Perspectives: Studies in Translation Theory and Practice Taylor & Francis

True friends are hard to find: A machine‐assisted investigation of false, true and just plain unreliable ‘friends’

True friends are hard to find: A machine‐assisted investigation of false, true and just plain unreliable ‘friends’


Abstract

Abstract The phenomenon of false friends is wellknown to translators. What have been studied much less, although they are probably more common, are pairs of words of similar form in related languages which are usually thought of and listed in bilingual dictionaries as reliable translation equivalents, but which, on closer scrutiny, often turn out to be used in different ways in the two languages. Taking examples from English and Italian (e.g. ‘correct’ and ‘corretto'), the author suggests ways of using computer concordancing to investigate context and thus help the translator to know when these ‘look‐alike’ items can be treated as equivalents and when, instead, another item from the same semantic field would be a better choice.

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References (9)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1747-6623
eISSN
0907-676X
DOI
10.1080/0907676X.1995.9961251
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The phenomenon of false friends is wellknown to translators. What have been studied much less, although they are probably more common, are pairs of words of similar form in related languages which are usually thought of and listed in bilingual dictionaries as reliable translation equivalents, but which, on closer scrutiny, often turn out to be used in different ways in the two languages. Taking examples from English and Italian (e.g. ‘correct’ and ‘corretto'), the author suggests ways of using computer concordancing to investigate context and thus help the translator to know when these ‘look‐alike’ items can be treated as equivalents and when, instead, another item from the same semantic field would be a better choice.

Journal

Perspectives: Studies in Translation Theory and PracticeTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1995

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