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What will have been said about gayness in teacher education

What will have been said about gayness in teacher education This article explores a theory of narrative that can account for its underlying structures and can critique a paradox of consciousness‐raising: that the more that narratives are privileged in teacher education, the less we know about how this narrative affects what will come to be said about teacher education's reliance upon stories of experience and identity. We bring this paradox to narratives of gayness in teacher education, suggesting three dominant orientations: narratives of difficulty, narratives of relationships and narratives of hospitality. Our resources for thinking about gayness are tied to archives of discrimination and freedom, themselves now affected by the pandemic known as AIDS. Each narrative, we argue, frames what can be said, what will have been said and what remains to be said. This way of analyzing the history of our present and what can count as a problem today, takes inspiration from an eighteenth‐century debate that focused on the question “What is enlightenment?” We argue that this debate allows for new conceptualizations of gayness in teacher education and that new conceptualizations of teacher education can emerge from an encounter with discussions of gayness. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Teaching Education Taylor & Francis

What will have been said about gayness in teacher education

Teaching Education , Volume 15 (1): 16 – Mar 1, 2004
16 pages

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References (39)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1470-1286
eISSN
1047-6210
DOI
10.1080/1047621042000180004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article explores a theory of narrative that can account for its underlying structures and can critique a paradox of consciousness‐raising: that the more that narratives are privileged in teacher education, the less we know about how this narrative affects what will come to be said about teacher education's reliance upon stories of experience and identity. We bring this paradox to narratives of gayness in teacher education, suggesting three dominant orientations: narratives of difficulty, narratives of relationships and narratives of hospitality. Our resources for thinking about gayness are tied to archives of discrimination and freedom, themselves now affected by the pandemic known as AIDS. Each narrative, we argue, frames what can be said, what will have been said and what remains to be said. This way of analyzing the history of our present and what can count as a problem today, takes inspiration from an eighteenth‐century debate that focused on the question “What is enlightenment?” We argue that this debate allows for new conceptualizations of gayness in teacher education and that new conceptualizations of teacher education can emerge from an encounter with discussions of gayness.

Journal

Teaching EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2004

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