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Youth citizenship and the politics of belonging: introducing contexts, voices, imaginaries

Youth citizenship and the politics of belonging: introducing contexts, voices, imaginaries Comparative Education Vol. 48, No. 1, February 2012, 1 – 10 EDITORIAL Youth citizenship and the politics of belonging: introducing contexts, voices, imaginaries Over the past 10 years, citizenship has come in for a lot of attention in the academic sphere. Those in political studies, development studies and comparative education have been particularly interested in investigating and understanding its importance and role in nation building, in building social cohesion and democratic citizenship. Contemporary occurrences, such as the recent Arab Spring (Zakaria 2011) and UK riots in 2011 (The Guardian 2011), also encourage us to consider young people’s con- temporary social movements, activism, their sense of belonging and their new under- standings of citizenship. We also know that we live in an ever growing young world. According to the United Nations, there is now a record 1.3 billion youth aged between 12 and 24 in the world – many of whom (130 million globally) cannot read or write. Child and ado- lescent cohorts make up between 40 and 60% of the total population in South East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, where there is increasing talk of a ‘demographic dividend’ (Bloom, Canning and Sevilla 2003; Lundberg and Lam 2007). This youth http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Education Taylor & Francis

Youth citizenship and the politics of belonging: introducing contexts, voices, imaginaries

Comparative Education , Volume 48 (1): 10 – Feb 1, 2012
10 pages

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References (40)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1360-0486
eISSN
0305-0068
DOI
10.1080/03050068.2011.637759
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Comparative Education Vol. 48, No. 1, February 2012, 1 – 10 EDITORIAL Youth citizenship and the politics of belonging: introducing contexts, voices, imaginaries Over the past 10 years, citizenship has come in for a lot of attention in the academic sphere. Those in political studies, development studies and comparative education have been particularly interested in investigating and understanding its importance and role in nation building, in building social cohesion and democratic citizenship. Contemporary occurrences, such as the recent Arab Spring (Zakaria 2011) and UK riots in 2011 (The Guardian 2011), also encourage us to consider young people’s con- temporary social movements, activism, their sense of belonging and their new under- standings of citizenship. We also know that we live in an ever growing young world. According to the United Nations, there is now a record 1.3 billion youth aged between 12 and 24 in the world – many of whom (130 million globally) cannot read or write. Child and ado- lescent cohorts make up between 40 and 60% of the total population in South East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, where there is increasing talk of a ‘demographic dividend’ (Bloom, Canning and Sevilla 2003; Lundberg and Lam 2007). This youth

Journal

Comparative EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Feb 1, 2012

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