Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Study of Raunkaier's Law of Frequence

A Study of Raunkaier's Law of Frequence LESLIE A. KENOYER Western lvlichigan State Teachers C allege HisTORICAL SuRVEY Numerous investigators in plant ecology have emphasized the importance of an accurate means of expressing the frequence of the different species in a plant association. It has long been recognized that one cannot, by looking at an association or a photograph of it, form an adequate conception as to the abundance of its various members; and it is even harder to convey a correct idea in writing because of the vagueness of such terms as ' rare,' ' occasional,' ' common,' ' abundant ' and the like. Rubel ('20), who gives an excellent summary of the development of plant sociology, calls attention to the fact that these terms are not only in- definite in numerical significance but that they are often used ambiguously, referring either to geographical extent in a region or to sociological extent as a part of a particular formation. Probably the first to use numerical scales was Heer C3S), who designated relative abundance by the numbers one to ten, and degree of association of individuals of a species by the same series of numbers. For example 2 : 9 would indicate that the plant is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecology Wiley

A Study of Raunkaier's Law of Frequence

Ecology , Volume 8 (3) – Jul 1, 1927

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/a-study-of-raunkaier-s-law-of-frequence-Klv8PSmt6d

References (1)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© Society for Community Research and Action
ISSN
0012-9658
eISSN
1939-9170
DOI
10.2307/1929336
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

LESLIE A. KENOYER Western lvlichigan State Teachers C allege HisTORICAL SuRVEY Numerous investigators in plant ecology have emphasized the importance of an accurate means of expressing the frequence of the different species in a plant association. It has long been recognized that one cannot, by looking at an association or a photograph of it, form an adequate conception as to the abundance of its various members; and it is even harder to convey a correct idea in writing because of the vagueness of such terms as ' rare,' ' occasional,' ' common,' ' abundant ' and the like. Rubel ('20), who gives an excellent summary of the development of plant sociology, calls attention to the fact that these terms are not only in- definite in numerical significance but that they are often used ambiguously, referring either to geographical extent in a region or to sociological extent as a part of a particular formation. Probably the first to use numerical scales was Heer C3S), who designated relative abundance by the numbers one to ten, and degree of association of individuals of a species by the same series of numbers. For example 2 : 9 would indicate that the plant is

Journal

EcologyWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1927

There are no references for this article.