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A SYSTEMATIC EXAMINATION OF DIFFERENT PARAMETERS OF PRESESSION EXPOSURE TO TANGIBLE STIMULI THAT MAINTAIN PROBLEM BEHAVIOR

A SYSTEMATIC EXAMINATION OF DIFFERENT PARAMETERS OF PRESESSION EXPOSURE TO TANGIBLE STIMULI THAT... We examined the effects of three different presession conditions on tangibly maintained problem behavior for 2 students with autism, using individual‐participant multielement designs. First, an analogue functional analysis demonstrated that problem behavior was maintained by access to tangible items. Next, topographies of item rejection were identified. Finally, students were exposed to (a) brief access, (b) no access, and (c) satiation to the tangible items prior to tangible sessions. The results demonstrated high levels of problem behavior following the brief‐access and no‐access presession conditions and low levels of problem behavior following the satiation condition. The findings are discussed in the context of how satiation might best be defined for these sorts of evaluations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis Wiley

A SYSTEMATIC EXAMINATION OF DIFFERENT PARAMETERS OF PRESESSION EXPOSURE TO TANGIBLE STIMULI THAT MAINTAIN PROBLEM BEHAVIOR

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References (35)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2009 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior
ISSN
0021-8855
eISSN
1938-3703
DOI
10.1901/jaba.2009.42-773
pmid
22102760
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We examined the effects of three different presession conditions on tangibly maintained problem behavior for 2 students with autism, using individual‐participant multielement designs. First, an analogue functional analysis demonstrated that problem behavior was maintained by access to tangible items. Next, topographies of item rejection were identified. Finally, students were exposed to (a) brief access, (b) no access, and (c) satiation to the tangible items prior to tangible sessions. The results demonstrated high levels of problem behavior following the brief‐access and no‐access presession conditions and low levels of problem behavior following the satiation condition. The findings are discussed in the context of how satiation might best be defined for these sorts of evaluations.

Journal

Journal of Applied Behavior AnalysisWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2009

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