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A vast machine: Computer models, climate data, and the politics of global warming

A vast machine: Computer models, climate data, and the politics of global warming The title of this large, if not quite vast, volume is certainly apt. Referring to John Ruskin's suggestion in the 1830s that a vast machine was needed to assemble useful meteorological information worldwide, this detailed history of meteorology and climate science tells the story of the gradual assembly of just such a “machine.” It is a complicated story of national efforts, attempts at international cooperation, false starts, incompatible measuring systems, and the emergence of a sense of the global that is closely intertwined with the growing understanding of climate as one interconnected system. While discussions of globalization frequently focus on economic and political matters, Edwards makes clear that scientific investigations and the growing importance of weather forecasting, combined with the possibilities of telegraph and subsequently radio communication, are a key early part of the story. Interrupted by war and political issues on many occasions, a global scientific effort on climate and meteorological investigations for forecasting purposes have gradually contributed to a wider sense of being part of one planetary system. How meteorology and short‐term weather forecasting are interconnected with the larger questions of climate and how they have frequently generated incompatible data sets is one of the more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Canadian Geographer/Le Geographe Canadien Wiley

A vast machine: Computer models, climate data, and the politics of global warming

The Canadian Geographer/Le Geographe Canadien , Volume 59 (1) – Mar 1, 2015

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References (11)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2015 Canadian Association of Geographers / L' Association canadienne des géographes
ISSN
0008-3658
eISSN
1541-0064
DOI
10.1111/cag.12157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The title of this large, if not quite vast, volume is certainly apt. Referring to John Ruskin's suggestion in the 1830s that a vast machine was needed to assemble useful meteorological information worldwide, this detailed history of meteorology and climate science tells the story of the gradual assembly of just such a “machine.” It is a complicated story of national efforts, attempts at international cooperation, false starts, incompatible measuring systems, and the emergence of a sense of the global that is closely intertwined with the growing understanding of climate as one interconnected system. While discussions of globalization frequently focus on economic and political matters, Edwards makes clear that scientific investigations and the growing importance of weather forecasting, combined with the possibilities of telegraph and subsequently radio communication, are a key early part of the story. Interrupted by war and political issues on many occasions, a global scientific effort on climate and meteorological investigations for forecasting purposes have gradually contributed to a wider sense of being part of one planetary system. How meteorology and short‐term weather forecasting are interconnected with the larger questions of climate and how they have frequently generated incompatible data sets is one of the more

Journal

The Canadian Geographer/Le Geographe CanadienWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2015

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