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Alienation of the Outsider: The Plight of Migrants

Alienation of the Outsider: The Plight of Migrants INTRODUCTION The phenomenon of uprooted populations is a most important and widespread social problem in the world, involving large-scale mobility of people. Two main types of migration make up this phenomenon, namely, rural to urban migration and international migration. As a case of international migration, the phenomenon of migrant labodmigrant populations in Europe will be examined in this paper, focusing mainly on its effects upon the immigrant family and the second generation. For comparison of the plight of international migrants with those from rural to urban areas, Turkish immigrants into Europe and into Turkish metropolitan centers will be considered. This allows for comparing migrant groups with the same point of origin in terms of national, ethnic, cultural, religious and social class characteristics, as well as the same traditional family culture. Issues relating to international labor into Europe will be examined first. The background and nature of international migration will be reviewed briefly to understand the extent of alienation involved in it. Rural to urban migration will then be dealt with, focusing on the Turkish experience for comparison with international migration. Finally there will be a discussion of alienation and the significance of the 'culture of relatedness'. INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Migration Wiley

Alienation of the Outsider: The Plight of Migrants

International Migration , Volume 25 (2) – Jun 1, 1987

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References (23)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 1987 IOM
ISSN
0020-7985
eISSN
1468-2435
DOI
10.1111/j.1468-2435.1987.tb00580.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION The phenomenon of uprooted populations is a most important and widespread social problem in the world, involving large-scale mobility of people. Two main types of migration make up this phenomenon, namely, rural to urban migration and international migration. As a case of international migration, the phenomenon of migrant labodmigrant populations in Europe will be examined in this paper, focusing mainly on its effects upon the immigrant family and the second generation. For comparison of the plight of international migrants with those from rural to urban areas, Turkish immigrants into Europe and into Turkish metropolitan centers will be considered. This allows for comparing migrant groups with the same point of origin in terms of national, ethnic, cultural, religious and social class characteristics, as well as the same traditional family culture. Issues relating to international labor into Europe will be examined first. The background and nature of international migration will be reviewed briefly to understand the extent of alienation involved in it. Rural to urban migration will then be dealt with, focusing on the Turkish experience for comparison with international migration. Finally there will be a discussion of alienation and the significance of the 'culture of relatedness'. INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION

Journal

International MigrationWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1987

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