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Between violence and desire: space, power, and identity in the making of metropolitan Delhi

Between violence and desire: space, power, and identity in the making of metropolitan Delhi Introduction Delhi, on the morning of January 30, 1995, was waking up to another winter day. In the well‐to‐do colony of Ashok Vihar, early risers were setting off on morning walks, some accompanied by their pet dogs. As one of these residents walked into the neighbourhood “park”, the only open area in the locality, he saw a young man, poorly clad, walking away with an empty bottle in hand. Incensed, he caught the man, called his neighbours and the police. A group of enraged house‐owners and two police constables descended on the youth and, within minutes, beat him to death. The young man was 18‐year‐old Dilip, a visitor to Delhi, who had come to watch the Republic Day parade in the capital. He was staying with his uncle in a jhuggi (shanty house) along the railway tracks bordering Ashok Vihar. His uncle worked as a labourer in an industrial estate nearby which, like all other planned industrial zones in Delhi, had no provision for workers' housing. The jhuggi cluster with more than 10,000 households shared three public toilets, each one with eight latrines, effectively one toilet per 2083 persons. For most residents, then, any large open space, under http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Social Science Journal Wiley

Between violence and desire: space, power, and identity in the making of metropolitan Delhi

International Social Science Journal , Volume 55 (175) – Mar 1, 2003

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References (25)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0020-8701
eISSN
1468-2451
DOI
10.1111/1468-2451.5501009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction Delhi, on the morning of January 30, 1995, was waking up to another winter day. In the well‐to‐do colony of Ashok Vihar, early risers were setting off on morning walks, some accompanied by their pet dogs. As one of these residents walked into the neighbourhood “park”, the only open area in the locality, he saw a young man, poorly clad, walking away with an empty bottle in hand. Incensed, he caught the man, called his neighbours and the police. A group of enraged house‐owners and two police constables descended on the youth and, within minutes, beat him to death. The young man was 18‐year‐old Dilip, a visitor to Delhi, who had come to watch the Republic Day parade in the capital. He was staying with his uncle in a jhuggi (shanty house) along the railway tracks bordering Ashok Vihar. His uncle worked as a labourer in an industrial estate nearby which, like all other planned industrial zones in Delhi, had no provision for workers' housing. The jhuggi cluster with more than 10,000 households shared three public toilets, each one with eight latrines, effectively one toilet per 2083 persons. For most residents, then, any large open space, under

Journal

International Social Science JournalWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2003

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