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Efficacy of Using a Single, Non‐Technical Variable to Predict the Academic Success of Freshmen Engineering Students

Efficacy of Using a Single, Non‐Technical Variable to Predict the Academic Success of Freshmen... This paper evaluates the efficacy of using freshman student scores from one non‐technical assignment to predict academic success as measured by cumulative grade point average after completion of the first two semesters enrolled at the Mercer University School of Engineering. The predictor assignment is keeping a dialectic course notebook and corresponds to the student's attitude, persistence, and organizational skills rather than math and science preparedness. Statistical analysis, at the 99 percent confidence level, indicated that there was a strong relationship between the student notebook scores and grade point average. Although there was scatter in the data, this one variable does provide insight into student success in the Mercer University Engineering program. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Engineering Education Wiley

Efficacy of Using a Single, Non‐Technical Variable to Predict the Academic Success of Freshmen Engineering Students

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References (28)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2003 American Society for Engineering Education
ISSN
1069-4730
eISSN
2168-9830
DOI
10.1002/j.2168-9830.2003.tb00736.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper evaluates the efficacy of using freshman student scores from one non‐technical assignment to predict academic success as measured by cumulative grade point average after completion of the first two semesters enrolled at the Mercer University School of Engineering. The predictor assignment is keeping a dialectic course notebook and corresponds to the student's attitude, persistence, and organizational skills rather than math and science preparedness. Statistical analysis, at the 99 percent confidence level, indicated that there was a strong relationship between the student notebook scores and grade point average. Although there was scatter in the data, this one variable does provide insight into student success in the Mercer University Engineering program.

Journal

Journal of Engineering EducationWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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