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European Demoicracy and Its Crisis

European Demoicracy and Its Crisis This article offers an overview and reconsideration of the idea of European demoicracy in the context of the current crisis. It defines ‘demoicracy’ as ‘a Union of peoples, understood both as states and as citizens, who govern together but not as one’, and argues that the concept is best understood as a third way, distinct from both national and supranational versions of single demos polities. The concept of ‘demoicracy’ can serve both as an analytical lens for the European Union‐as‐is and as a normative benchmark, but one which cannot simply be inferred from its praxis. Instead, the article deploys a ‘normative‐inductive’ approach according to which the EU's normative core – transnational non‐domination and transnational mutual recognition – is grounded on what the EU still seeks to escape. Such norms need to be protected and perfected if the EU is to live up to its demoicratic nature. The article suggests ten tentative guiding principles for the EU to continue turning these norms into practice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JCMS: Journal of Common Market Studies Wiley

European Demoicracy and Its Crisis

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References (92)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
0021-9886
eISSN
1468-5965
DOI
10.1111/jcms.12006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article offers an overview and reconsideration of the idea of European demoicracy in the context of the current crisis. It defines ‘demoicracy’ as ‘a Union of peoples, understood both as states and as citizens, who govern together but not as one’, and argues that the concept is best understood as a third way, distinct from both national and supranational versions of single demos polities. The concept of ‘demoicracy’ can serve both as an analytical lens for the European Union‐as‐is and as a normative benchmark, but one which cannot simply be inferred from its praxis. Instead, the article deploys a ‘normative‐inductive’ approach according to which the EU's normative core – transnational non‐domination and transnational mutual recognition – is grounded on what the EU still seeks to escape. Such norms need to be protected and perfected if the EU is to live up to its demoicratic nature. The article suggests ten tentative guiding principles for the EU to continue turning these norms into practice.

Journal

JCMS: Journal of Common Market StudiesWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2013

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