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FOUNDATION FOR A GENERAL STRAIN THEORY OF CRIME AND DELINQUENCY *

FOUNDATION FOR A GENERAL STRAIN THEORY OF CRIME AND DELINQUENCY * This paper presents a general strain theory of crime and delinquency that is capable of overcoming the criticisms of previous strain theories. In the first section, strain theory is distinguished from social control and differential association/social learning theory. In the second section, the three major types of strain are described: (1) strain as the actual or anticipated failure to achieve positively valued goals, (2) strain as the actual or anticipated removal of positively valued stimuli, and (3) strain as the actual or anticipated presentation of negatively valued stimuli. In the third section, guidelines for the measurement of strain are presented. And in the fourth section, the major adaptations to strain are described, and those factors influencing the choice of delinquent versus nondelinquent adaptations are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Criminology Wiley

FOUNDATION FOR A GENERAL STRAIN THEORY OF CRIME AND DELINQUENCY *

Criminology , Volume 30 (1) – Feb 1, 1992

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References (149)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0011-1384
eISSN
1745-9125
DOI
10.1111/j.1745-9125.1992.tb01093.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper presents a general strain theory of crime and delinquency that is capable of overcoming the criticisms of previous strain theories. In the first section, strain theory is distinguished from social control and differential association/social learning theory. In the second section, the three major types of strain are described: (1) strain as the actual or anticipated failure to achieve positively valued goals, (2) strain as the actual or anticipated removal of positively valued stimuli, and (3) strain as the actual or anticipated presentation of negatively valued stimuli. In the third section, guidelines for the measurement of strain are presented. And in the fourth section, the major adaptations to strain are described, and those factors influencing the choice of delinquent versus nondelinquent adaptations are discussed.

Journal

CriminologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1992

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