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Gender Bias in China, South Korea and India 1920–1990: Effects of War, Famine and Fertility Decline

Gender Bias in China, South Korea and India 1920–1990: Effects of War, Famine and Fertility Decline How has the history of the twentieth century affected the extent of female disadvantage in child survival in China, South Korea and India, and how has this in turn shaped spousal availability and marriage payments? These three countries have similar kinship systems which generate discrimination against girls, and they show the highest levels of excess female child mortality in the world. This article explores how the extent of excess female child mortality was influenced by historical events in these countries in the period 1920–90, and discusses some of the substantial social ramifications of resulting changes in sex ratios. The authors hypothesize that these changes encouraged the retention of brideprice in China while dowry became the norm in India, and illustrate how these demographic changes have influenced the extent and manifestations of violence against women. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Development and Change Wiley

Gender Bias in China, South Korea and India 1920–1990: Effects of War, Famine and Fertility Decline

Development and Change , Volume 30 (3) – Jul 1, 1999

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References (52)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0012-155X
eISSN
1467-7660
DOI
10.1111/1467-7660.00131
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

How has the history of the twentieth century affected the extent of female disadvantage in child survival in China, South Korea and India, and how has this in turn shaped spousal availability and marriage payments? These three countries have similar kinship systems which generate discrimination against girls, and they show the highest levels of excess female child mortality in the world. This article explores how the extent of excess female child mortality was influenced by historical events in these countries in the period 1920–90, and discusses some of the substantial social ramifications of resulting changes in sex ratios. The authors hypothesize that these changes encouraged the retention of brideprice in China while dowry became the norm in India, and illustrate how these demographic changes have influenced the extent and manifestations of violence against women.

Journal

Development and ChangeWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1999

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