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Governance as theory: five propositions

Governance as theory: five propositions Gerry Stoker ing and ways of working. In Britain and the United States the word governance has undoubtedly entered the vocabulary of elected and unelected officials. Governance also has a resonance in the policy debates of other Western democracies. In developing countries, too, governance has entered the policy arena. For the World Bank it is at times reduced to a commitment to efficient and accountable government. Others use it more broadly, and in tune with the tenor of this article, to recognize the interdependence of public, private and voluntary sectors in developing countries. Of course governance is sometimes used for rhetorical rather than substantive reasons. At times in Osborne and Gaebler (1992) governance appears to be used in place of government as if ‘government’ was a difficult word to sell in a privatized, market-orientated society. Governance is about a ‘reinvented’ form of government which is better managed. The Osborne and Gaebler work is about how a government might make sensible and effective use of a wider range of tools beyond the direct provision of services. Governance for them is about the potential for contracting, franchising and new forms of regulation. In short, it is about what others refer http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Social Science Journal Wiley

Governance as theory: five propositions

International Social Science Journal , Volume 50 (155) – Mar 1, 1998

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References (33)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
UNESCO 1998
ISSN
0020-8701
eISSN
1468-2451
DOI
10.1111/1468-2451.00106
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Gerry Stoker ing and ways of working. In Britain and the United States the word governance has undoubtedly entered the vocabulary of elected and unelected officials. Governance also has a resonance in the policy debates of other Western democracies. In developing countries, too, governance has entered the policy arena. For the World Bank it is at times reduced to a commitment to efficient and accountable government. Others use it more broadly, and in tune with the tenor of this article, to recognize the interdependence of public, private and voluntary sectors in developing countries. Of course governance is sometimes used for rhetorical rather than substantive reasons. At times in Osborne and Gaebler (1992) governance appears to be used in place of government as if ‘government’ was a difficult word to sell in a privatized, market-orientated society. Governance is about a ‘reinvented’ form of government which is better managed. The Osborne and Gaebler work is about how a government might make sensible and effective use of a wider range of tools beyond the direct provision of services. Governance for them is about the potential for contracting, franchising and new forms of regulation. In short, it is about what others refer

Journal

International Social Science JournalWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1998

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