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Medical application of glycosaminoglycans: a review

Medical application of glycosaminoglycans: a review The characteristic molecular composition of the different glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is related to their role as structural components and regulators of a multitude of functions of proteins, cells and tissues in the human body. Therefore, it is not surprising that GAGs are widely used as coating materials for implants, components of 3D‐constructs such as tissue engineering scaffolds and hydrogels, but also as diagnostic devices such as biosensors and in controlled release applications. Beside a physisorption or encapsulation of GAGs, these applications often require their chemical modification to allow a stable covalent attachment on surfaces or cross‐linking reactions with other molecules. Then, the preservation of the functionality of GAGs under maintenance of their biocompatibility is a challenging task and must be addressed in accordance with the designated field of application. Here, we will give a brief overview on structure and biological functions of GAGs, different methods of their activation and immobilization, the recent progress in GAG‐related biomaterials development, as well as some examples of their application in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Wiley

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References (288)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1932-6254
eISSN
1932-7005
DOI
10.1002/term.2398
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The characteristic molecular composition of the different glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is related to their role as structural components and regulators of a multitude of functions of proteins, cells and tissues in the human body. Therefore, it is not surprising that GAGs are widely used as coating materials for implants, components of 3D‐constructs such as tissue engineering scaffolds and hydrogels, but also as diagnostic devices such as biosensors and in controlled release applications. Beside a physisorption or encapsulation of GAGs, these applications often require their chemical modification to allow a stable covalent attachment on surfaces or cross‐linking reactions with other molecules. Then, the preservation of the functionality of GAGs under maintenance of their biocompatibility is a challenging task and must be addressed in accordance with the designated field of application. Here, we will give a brief overview on structure and biological functions of GAGs, different methods of their activation and immobilization, the recent progress in GAG‐related biomaterials development, as well as some examples of their application in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative MedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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