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Multipartnered Fertility: Can It Be Reduced?

Multipartnered Fertility: Can It Be Reduced? During the past five years, multipartnered fertility has gained recognition as a problem whose importance is perhaps equal to that of nonmarital childbearing, unintended childbearing and childbearing among women younger than age 18. Much of the data on multipartnered fertility has come from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. In this issue of Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health , Guzzo and Furstenberg add to the relatively sparse literature by examining the characteristics associated with multipartnered fertility among women who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). These characteristics include childbearing that begins early, outside of marriage and with a partner who has a weak relationship with the mother. The importance of the problem Is multipartnered fertility a matter that should be addressed by federal and state policy? To be considered a problem that merits a policy solution, multipartnered fertility must be reasonably common and must have important consequences. Guzzo and Furstenberg found that the prevalence of multipartnered fertility among female Add Health respondents was quite low: Only 3% of the young women had had births with multiple partners. This finding may reflect that respondents were still at the beginning of their childbearing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health Wiley

Multipartnered Fertility: Can It Be Reduced?

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References (15)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1538-6341
eISSN
1931-2393
DOI
10.1363/3905607
pmid
17355382
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

During the past five years, multipartnered fertility has gained recognition as a problem whose importance is perhaps equal to that of nonmarital childbearing, unintended childbearing and childbearing among women younger than age 18. Much of the data on multipartnered fertility has come from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. In this issue of Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health , Guzzo and Furstenberg add to the relatively sparse literature by examining the characteristics associated with multipartnered fertility among women who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). These characteristics include childbearing that begins early, outside of marriage and with a partner who has a weak relationship with the mother. The importance of the problem Is multipartnered fertility a matter that should be addressed by federal and state policy? To be considered a problem that merits a policy solution, multipartnered fertility must be reasonably common and must have important consequences. Guzzo and Furstenberg found that the prevalence of multipartnered fertility among female Add Health respondents was quite low: Only 3% of the young women had had births with multiple partners. This finding may reflect that respondents were still at the beginning of their childbearing

Journal

Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive HealthWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2007

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