Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Normal human sleep: Regional cerebral hemodynamics

Normal human sleep: Regional cerebral hemodynamics Measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) by the xenon 133 inhalation method along with polygraph recordings were made serially during relaxed wakefulness and different stages of nocturnal sleep in 18 righthanded normal volunteers. During stage I‐II sleep the fast flow (Fg) values declined significantly, more in the brainstem‐cerebellar (BSC) regions than in hemispheric regions. During stage III‐IV sleep, Fg further declined diffusely in both hemispheric (‐28%) and BSC (‐29%) regions. Duringg awakening from stage IV sleep to alpha‐frequency wakefulness, BSC flow values increased more than hemispheric flow values. During REM sleep, regional Fg values increased diffusely in both hemispheric (+41%) and BSC (+47%) regions compared with wakefulness. There was a significant inverse correlation between the increase in end‐tidal partial pressure for carbon dioxide and the reduction in bihemispheric Fg during sleep. Cerebral vasomotor responsiveness to carbon dioxide is decreased during both REM and non‐REM sleep. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Neurology Wiley

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/normal-human-sleep-regional-cerebral-hemodynamics-AxCDeB40uY

References (53)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1980 American Neurological Association
ISSN
0364-5134
eISSN
1531-8249
DOI
10.1002/ana.410070514
pmid
7396425
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) by the xenon 133 inhalation method along with polygraph recordings were made serially during relaxed wakefulness and different stages of nocturnal sleep in 18 righthanded normal volunteers. During stage I‐II sleep the fast flow (Fg) values declined significantly, more in the brainstem‐cerebellar (BSC) regions than in hemispheric regions. During stage III‐IV sleep, Fg further declined diffusely in both hemispheric (‐28%) and BSC (‐29%) regions. Duringg awakening from stage IV sleep to alpha‐frequency wakefulness, BSC flow values increased more than hemispheric flow values. During REM sleep, regional Fg values increased diffusely in both hemispheric (+41%) and BSC (+47%) regions compared with wakefulness. There was a significant inverse correlation between the increase in end‐tidal partial pressure for carbon dioxide and the reduction in bihemispheric Fg during sleep. Cerebral vasomotor responsiveness to carbon dioxide is decreased during both REM and non‐REM sleep.

Journal

Annals of NeurologyWiley

Published: May 1, 1980

There are no references for this article.