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Political efficacy: Enhancing the construct and its relationship to mobilization of people

Political efficacy: Enhancing the construct and its relationship to mobilization of people Political efficacy is a term used to represent an individual's perceived ability to participate in and influence the political system. It has been suggested that political efficacy is composed of two distinct components: internal and external political efficacy (Balch, 1974; McPherson, Miller, Welch, & Clark, 1977). The purpose of this article is to work toward an even broader and more precise conceptualization of political efficacy and its relationship to mobilization of people. Collective political efficacy is proposed as a third component in the political efficacy construct. Research findings presented in the article offer some exploratory information concerning the relationships of this new component with the other political efficacy components. The findings are from a research project that involved the creation of a Homeless Persons Union. In addition to examining relationships among the political efficacy components, findings revealing effects of the intervention are briefly described in order to examine further the role of political efficacy in relation to mobilization of people. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Community Psychology Wiley

Political efficacy: Enhancing the construct and its relationship to mobilization of people

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References (25)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0090-4392
eISSN
1520-6629
DOI
10.1002/1520-6629(199407)22:3<259::AID-JCOP2290220306>3.0.CO;2-H
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Political efficacy is a term used to represent an individual's perceived ability to participate in and influence the political system. It has been suggested that political efficacy is composed of two distinct components: internal and external political efficacy (Balch, 1974; McPherson, Miller, Welch, & Clark, 1977). The purpose of this article is to work toward an even broader and more precise conceptualization of political efficacy and its relationship to mobilization of people. Collective political efficacy is proposed as a third component in the political efficacy construct. Research findings presented in the article offer some exploratory information concerning the relationships of this new component with the other political efficacy components. The findings are from a research project that involved the creation of a Homeless Persons Union. In addition to examining relationships among the political efficacy components, findings revealing effects of the intervention are briefly described in order to examine further the role of political efficacy in relation to mobilization of people.

Journal

Journal of Community PsychologyWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1994

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