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Poverty in Canada and the United States: measurement, trends, and implications

Poverty in Canada and the United States: measurement, trends, and implications Poverty in Canada and the United States: measurement, trends, and implications Lars Osberg Department of Economics, Dalhousie University 1. Introduction Although Canada and the United States are two of the richest countries in the world , many Canadians and Americans perceive themselves, and are perceived by others, to be poor – which raises the issue of how best to measure poverty. Within Canada, there are widespread worries that the self-image of Canada as a place with relatively little poverty ~somewhat ‘kinder and gentler’ than the United States!,may be a bit outdated ~see Graves, Dugas, and Beauchamp 1999; Angus Reid 1999!. Poverty in Canada has been rising, while in the United States it has been falling in recent years – which raises the issues of why that has been happening and what it will mean, in the longer term, for Canada and the United States as a whole. In this paper, therefore, I begin by asking how poverty in affluent countries should be measured , before examining recent evidence on poverty intensity and its social significance. In section 1 the use of the Sen-Shorrocks-Thon index of poverty intensity is advocated , and the ‘Poverty Box’ is introduced as a summary http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue Canadienne D'économique Wiley

Poverty in Canada and the United States: measurement, trends, and implications

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References (56)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0008-4085
eISSN
1540-5982
DOI
10.1111/0008-4085.00045
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Poverty in Canada and the United States: measurement, trends, and implications Lars Osberg Department of Economics, Dalhousie University 1. Introduction Although Canada and the United States are two of the richest countries in the world , many Canadians and Americans perceive themselves, and are perceived by others, to be poor – which raises the issue of how best to measure poverty. Within Canada, there are widespread worries that the self-image of Canada as a place with relatively little poverty ~somewhat ‘kinder and gentler’ than the United States!,may be a bit outdated ~see Graves, Dugas, and Beauchamp 1999; Angus Reid 1999!. Poverty in Canada has been rising, while in the United States it has been falling in recent years – which raises the issues of why that has been happening and what it will mean, in the longer term, for Canada and the United States as a whole. In this paper, therefore, I begin by asking how poverty in affluent countries should be measured , before examining recent evidence on poverty intensity and its social significance. In section 1 the use of the Sen-Shorrocks-Thon index of poverty intensity is advocated , and the ‘Poverty Box’ is introduced as a summary

Journal

Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue Canadienne D'économiqueWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2000

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