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Probation, Punishment and Restorative Justice: Should Al Turism be Engaged in Punishment?

Probation, Punishment and Restorative Justice: Should Al Turism be Engaged in Punishment? The argument of this article is that we should understand probation as a mode of punishment: not as the kind of ‘merely punitive’ punishment which is all too familiar in our existing penal systems, but as a mode of constructive punishment which seeks to bring offenders to face up to the effects and implications of their crimes, to rehabilitate them, and to secure the kinds of goal — reparation and reconciliation — that are emphasised by advocates of restorative justice. To support this argument, I sketch a conception of punishment as a communicative enterprise in which probation officers would play a crucial role — not merely in administering sentences, but as mediators between offenders, victims and the wider community. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice Wiley

Probation, Punishment and Restorative Justice: Should Al Turism be Engaged in Punishment?

The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice , Volume 42 (2) – Jan 1, 2003

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References (38)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0265-5527
eISSN
1468-2311
DOI
10.1111/1468-2311.00275
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The argument of this article is that we should understand probation as a mode of punishment: not as the kind of ‘merely punitive’ punishment which is all too familiar in our existing penal systems, but as a mode of constructive punishment which seeks to bring offenders to face up to the effects and implications of their crimes, to rehabilitate them, and to secure the kinds of goal — reparation and reconciliation — that are emphasised by advocates of restorative justice. To support this argument, I sketch a conception of punishment as a communicative enterprise in which probation officers would play a crucial role — not merely in administering sentences, but as mediators between offenders, victims and the wider community.

Journal

The Howard Journal of Criminal JusticeWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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