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Risk Perception and Communication

Risk Perception and Communication This issue begins with two letters to the editor and two replies and, as always, we welcome your input and comments. During the last year, our journal has become a major vehicle for presenting cutting‐edge homeland security analyses and research. We begin with a letter to the editor by John Hall and a response by Tony Cox regarding the use of game theory as part of risk analysis in homeland security applications related to terrorism. For those of us, such as the editor, who first learned about game theory as a student in the 1960s, Hall's labeling of game theory as the “elephant in the room” and Cox's reply recalls similar debates regarding applications of game theory to water distribution, pollution, facility siting, and other policy‐related topics. The second set of letters focuses on a paper by Richard Young and Christopher Schreiner that found that hands‐free cell phone devices substantially reduce the risk of cell phone related automobile accidents. In her letter, Elisa Braver questions the design of the study and finds it inconsistent with other epidemiologic analyses. Richard Young and Christopher Schreiner reply to the four points raised by Braver. Eight of the nine papers in this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Risk Analysis Wiley

Risk Perception and Communication

Risk Analysis , Volume 29 (8) – Aug 1, 2009

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References (81)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2009 Society for Risk Analysis
ISSN
0272-4332
eISSN
1539-6924
DOI
10.1111/j.1539-6924.2009.01270.x
pmid
19659546
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This issue begins with two letters to the editor and two replies and, as always, we welcome your input and comments. During the last year, our journal has become a major vehicle for presenting cutting‐edge homeland security analyses and research. We begin with a letter to the editor by John Hall and a response by Tony Cox regarding the use of game theory as part of risk analysis in homeland security applications related to terrorism. For those of us, such as the editor, who first learned about game theory as a student in the 1960s, Hall's labeling of game theory as the “elephant in the room” and Cox's reply recalls similar debates regarding applications of game theory to water distribution, pollution, facility siting, and other policy‐related topics. The second set of letters focuses on a paper by Richard Young and Christopher Schreiner that found that hands‐free cell phone devices substantially reduce the risk of cell phone related automobile accidents. In her letter, Elisa Braver questions the design of the study and finds it inconsistent with other epidemiologic analyses. Richard Young and Christopher Schreiner reply to the four points raised by Braver. Eight of the nine papers in this

Journal

Risk AnalysisWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2009

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