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Sample size in qualitative research

Sample size in qualitative research A common misconception about sampling in qualitative research is that numbers are unimportant in ensuring the adequacy of a sampling strategy. Yet, simple sizes may be too small to support claims of having achieved either informational redundancy or theoretical saturation, or too large to permit the deep, case‐oriented analysis that is the raison‐d'etre of qualitative inquiry. Determining adequate sample size in qualitative research is ultimately a matter of judgment and experience in evaluating the quality of the information collected against the uses to which it will be put, the particular research method and purposeful sampling strategy employed, and the research product intended. ©1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Nursing & Health Wiley

Sample size in qualitative research

Research in Nursing & Health , Volume 18 (2) – Apr 1, 1995

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References (25)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 1995 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0160-6891
eISSN
1098-240X
DOI
10.1002/nur.4770180211
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A common misconception about sampling in qualitative research is that numbers are unimportant in ensuring the adequacy of a sampling strategy. Yet, simple sizes may be too small to support claims of having achieved either informational redundancy or theoretical saturation, or too large to permit the deep, case‐oriented analysis that is the raison‐d'etre of qualitative inquiry. Determining adequate sample size in qualitative research is ultimately a matter of judgment and experience in evaluating the quality of the information collected against the uses to which it will be put, the particular research method and purposeful sampling strategy employed, and the research product intended. ©1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Journal

Research in Nursing & HealthWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1995

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