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Stakeholders in Universities and Colleges in Flanders

Stakeholders in Universities and Colleges in Flanders Introduction The participation of `stakeholders' in the internal governance of universities and colleges (hogescholen) in Flanders has a long tradition. Universities have had a democratic governance structure for some 30 years now, with a representation of both university staff and stakeholders. A similar structure developed in the college sector. Therefore, when analysing changes in Flanders related to the `stakeholder society' over the last decade, it is not so much the issue of new stakeholders that is central, but the relative importance of each group of stakeholders in university and college policy making processes. The notion of `stakeholder society' points at two developments with regard to the participation of `external actors' in higher education systems (see the Editorial). First, it indicates a shift in the role assigned to these representatives of `external society'. Second, it implies increasing responsibility on the part of higher education to account to the general public for its actions. In Flanders, these developments also seem to have taken place. In the last ten years, the Flemish government has increasingly stressed the importance of higher education's openness to society. From its point of view, a maximum amount of autonomy must be granted to each university and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Education Wiley

Stakeholders in Universities and Colleges in Flanders

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References (13)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0141-8211
eISSN
1465-3435
DOI
10.1111/1467-3435.00037
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction The participation of `stakeholders' in the internal governance of universities and colleges (hogescholen) in Flanders has a long tradition. Universities have had a democratic governance structure for some 30 years now, with a representation of both university staff and stakeholders. A similar structure developed in the college sector. Therefore, when analysing changes in Flanders related to the `stakeholder society' over the last decade, it is not so much the issue of new stakeholders that is central, but the relative importance of each group of stakeholders in university and college policy making processes. The notion of `stakeholder society' points at two developments with regard to the participation of `external actors' in higher education systems (see the Editorial). First, it indicates a shift in the role assigned to these representatives of `external society'. Second, it implies increasing responsibility on the part of higher education to account to the general public for its actions. In Flanders, these developments also seem to have taken place. In the last ten years, the Flemish government has increasingly stressed the importance of higher education's openness to society. From its point of view, a maximum amount of autonomy must be granted to each university and

Journal

European Journal of EducationWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2000

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