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The Canonical Distribution of Commonness and Rarity: Part I

The Canonical Distribution of Commonness and Rarity: Part I ECOLOGY No.2 VoL. 43 SPRING 1%2 F. w. PRESTON Preston Laboratories, Butler, Pemzs:,•lvania would have a value of about 3.5 octaves, and, since POSTULATES AND THEORY there are 3.3 octaves to an "order of magnitude," Introduction CJ would be a little more than an order of magni- tude. In an earlier paper (Preston 1948) we found If we now make a 2nd graph in which, using that, in a sufficiently large aggregation of indi- viduals of many species, the individuals often the same abscissae, we plot as ordinate not the number of species (y) that fall in each interval tended to be distributed among the species accord- but the number of individuals which those y spe- ing to a lognormal law. 'vVe plotted as abscissa cies comprise. we get another lognormal curve equal increments in the logarithms of the number with the same standard deviation as the first of individuals representing a species, and as ordi- nate the number of species falling into each of graph, but with its mode or peak displaced to the right. This we call the "Individuals Curve." these increments. We found it convenient to use as such increments the "octave," that is the in- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecology Wiley

The Canonical Distribution of Commonness and Rarity: Part I

Ecology , Volume 43 (2) – Apr 1, 1962

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© Society for Community Research and Action
ISSN
0012-9658
eISSN
1939-9170
DOI
10.2307/1931976
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ECOLOGY No.2 VoL. 43 SPRING 1%2 F. w. PRESTON Preston Laboratories, Butler, Pemzs:,•lvania would have a value of about 3.5 octaves, and, since POSTULATES AND THEORY there are 3.3 octaves to an "order of magnitude," Introduction CJ would be a little more than an order of magni- tude. In an earlier paper (Preston 1948) we found If we now make a 2nd graph in which, using that, in a sufficiently large aggregation of indi- viduals of many species, the individuals often the same abscissae, we plot as ordinate not the number of species (y) that fall in each interval tended to be distributed among the species accord- but the number of individuals which those y spe- ing to a lognormal law. 'vVe plotted as abscissa cies comprise. we get another lognormal curve equal increments in the logarithms of the number with the same standard deviation as the first of individuals representing a species, and as ordi- nate the number of species falling into each of graph, but with its mode or peak displaced to the right. This we call the "Individuals Curve." these increments. We found it convenient to use as such increments the "octave," that is the in-

Journal

EcologyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1962

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