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The reproduction of gender: housework and attitudes towards gender equality in the home among Swedish boys and girls

The reproduction of gender: housework and attitudes towards gender equality in the home among... The housework Swedish girls and boys age 10 to 18 do, and their attitudes towards gender equality in the home are studied. One aim is to see whether the work children do is gendered and if so, whether they follow their parents’, often gendered, pattern in housework. A second aim is to see whether children's attitudes are influenced by their parents’ attitudes and practices. When it comes to issues like these, Sweden is of special interest because in 1995, Sweden was appointed the most gender equal country in the world by the United Nations. The data used were the Swedish Child Level of Living Survey 2000 (see http://www.sofi.su.se/LNU2000/english.htm), a data set that includes extensive first‐hand information from both children and their parents. The results indicate that girls and boys in two‐parent families are more prone to engage in gender atypical work the more their parent of the same sex engages in this kind of work. The fact that girls still do more housework than boys in all families independent of, among other things, the parental division of housework and the mother's educational level indicates that housework to some extent signifies gender also to children. However, no clear relation is found between the parents’ division of work and the child's attitude towards gender equality in the home. Neither is there any clear relation between the parents’ attitude towards gender equality in the home and the children's attitude to the same topic. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The British Journal of Sociology Wiley

The reproduction of gender: housework and attitudes towards gender equality in the home among Swedish boys and girls

The British Journal of Sociology , Volume 57 (3) – Sep 1, 2006

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References (27)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0007-1315
eISSN
1468-4446
DOI
10.1111/j.1468-4446.2006.00118.x
pmid
16939594
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The housework Swedish girls and boys age 10 to 18 do, and their attitudes towards gender equality in the home are studied. One aim is to see whether the work children do is gendered and if so, whether they follow their parents’, often gendered, pattern in housework. A second aim is to see whether children's attitudes are influenced by their parents’ attitudes and practices. When it comes to issues like these, Sweden is of special interest because in 1995, Sweden was appointed the most gender equal country in the world by the United Nations. The data used were the Swedish Child Level of Living Survey 2000 (see http://www.sofi.su.se/LNU2000/english.htm), a data set that includes extensive first‐hand information from both children and their parents. The results indicate that girls and boys in two‐parent families are more prone to engage in gender atypical work the more their parent of the same sex engages in this kind of work. The fact that girls still do more housework than boys in all families independent of, among other things, the parental division of housework and the mother's educational level indicates that housework to some extent signifies gender also to children. However, no clear relation is found between the parents’ division of work and the child's attitude towards gender equality in the home. Neither is there any clear relation between the parents’ attitude towards gender equality in the home and the children's attitude to the same topic.

Journal

The British Journal of SociologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2006

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