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Women and the Public Sphere

Women and the Public Sphere In Britain during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the contrast between ‘public’ and ‘private’ worlds drew not on one, but on multiple, contrasts. However, recognising such variations does not necessarily provide us with new analytical tools. This article examines some of the ways in which twentieth‐century commentators have attempted to categorise these contrasts. In particular the article critically engages with Habermas's definition of the public sphere and suggests the advantages and disadvantages of using his notion through a discussion of the relationship of the British women's suffrage movement to the debate over citizenship in the 1860s. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Gender & History Wiley

Women and the Public Sphere

Gender & History , Volume 11 (3) – Nov 1, 1999

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References (45)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 1999.
ISSN
0953-5233
eISSN
1468-0424
DOI
10.1111/1468-0424.00157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In Britain during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the contrast between ‘public’ and ‘private’ worlds drew not on one, but on multiple, contrasts. However, recognising such variations does not necessarily provide us with new analytical tools. This article examines some of the ways in which twentieth‐century commentators have attempted to categorise these contrasts. In particular the article critically engages with Habermas's definition of the public sphere and suggests the advantages and disadvantages of using his notion through a discussion of the relationship of the British women's suffrage movement to the debate over citizenship in the 1860s.

Journal

Gender & HistoryWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1999

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